What happens when we Continually do what we “Should” over what we Want.

I have easily spent 95 percent of my life doing what I should.

Doing things out of a sense of obligation or responsibility without giving much thought as to whether those things brought me personal satisfaction.

Personally and professionally, I’ve been known to be dependable. If you need help with anything at all— just ask Annie!

Doing What I Should

Do you know what happens when we continually put the shoulds ahead of the wants?

We walk around perpetually drained. Even when we get around to our wants, they don’t bring us the fulfillment and joy we were expecting to get from them. We’re so worn down by the weight of everything we should do that the things we want to do end up feeling like just another obligation on our list.

When I think of all the things I have done over the years just because I felt that I should, my head spins. I started drinking daily because a boss told me I should. That sounds ludicrous even to me. I didn’t want to drink. I was quite happy without it, but I was told I should in order to advance my career. The deals happen at the bar!

I should take that promotion even though I had already figured out I wasn’t really a city dweller. Living in Brooklyn left me longing for the secluded mountain top cabin from my childhood in Colorado. Yet, I took the promotion that sent me to London because it was the right thing to do.

Time after time, year after year, I kept doing what I should. I’m not saying none of it brought me joy and happiness, but it always felt like my tank was never full. I was that person rolling up to the gas tank running on fumes. Each time I was just adding enough fuel from my “wants” pump to make it home. The low fuel light kept flashing and I kept ignoring it.

The Alcohol Experiment

If you’ve moved past feeling like you should change your relationship with alcohol to a place where it is what you want and what you desire – join us in The Alcohol Experiment. This free 30-day challenge has helped over 230,000 people rethink their drinking. Learn more at The Alcohol Experiment.

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